A VPN – Virtual Private Network – is one solution to establishing long-distance and/or secured network connections. VPNs are normally implemented by businesses or organizations rather than by individuals, but virtual networks can be reached from inside a home network. Compared to other technologies, VPNs offers several advantages, particularly benefits for wireless local area networking.

Large corporations or businesses with knowledgeable IT staff typically purchase, deploy and maintain their own remote-access VPNs. Businesses can also choose to outsource their remote-access VPN services through an enterprise service provider (ESP). The ESP sets up a NAS for the business and keeps that NAS running smoothly.

A remote-access VPN is great for individual employees, but what about entire branch offices with dozens or even hundreds of employees? Next, we’ll look at another type of VPN used to keep businesses connected LAN-to-LAN.

A VPN can save an organization money in several situations:

  • eliminating the need for expensive long-distance leased lines
  • reducing long-distance telephone charges
  • offloading support costs

VPNs vs leased lines – Organizations historically needed to rent network capacity such as T1 lines to achieve full, secured connectivity between their office locations. With a VPN, you use public network infrastructure including the Internet to make these connections and tap into that virtual network through much cheaper local leased lines or even just broadband connections to a nearby Internet Service Provider (ISP) .

Long distance phone charges – A VPN also can replace remote access servers and long-distance dialup network connections commonly used in the past by business travelers needing to access to their company intranet. For example, with an Internet VPN, clients need only connect to the nearest service provider’s access point that is usually local.